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Transnational challenges

The waning distinction between internal and external security challenges is increasingly shaping the EU’s role and broadening its tasks. Transnational challenges – terrorism, organised crime or proliferation of weapons of mass destruction – not only pose a threat to European internal security, but also have a serious impact on the stability of Europe’s immediate neighbourhood.

At the same time, global and regional trends regarding shifting demographics, migration, natural resources or the impact of climate change suggest that state and non-state actors alike will need to create innovative approaches to deal with challenges which do not stop at any one border.

Finally, there are also issues which have only recently emerged on the global agenda – cyberspace, global commons, the Arctic, renewables and unconventional energy sources – and either require the adaptation of existing regulations or call for new sets of rules and norms entirely. With a growing level of interconnectivity between states, it is also obvious that no nation can address those challenges alone. For these reasons, the European Union has been active in debates on the governance of transnational challenges, and accelerated efforts to enhance its own capabilities by designing new policy instruments. The EUISS supports the efforts undertaken by the European Union institutions by providing analyses of the most important domains in this broad and ever-evolving field.

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