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Security and defence

The Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) is an integral part of EU foreign policy. Through its military operations and civilian missions, the EU has contributed to regional and global stability. Since it's inception, the CSDP has responded to a shifting regional security context. It has played a vital role in crisis management in the EU's near and wider neighbourhood but it is also an essential part of the EU's broader approach to the protection of Europe and capacity building.

Although the Lisbon Treaty consolidated the EU's crisis management apparatus, the EU Global Strategy has set a new level of ambition for EU defence. In addition to the CSDP playing an operational role in the EU's integrated approach to crises, the EU Global Strategy has stressed the need for the EU to become a more capable and effective defence actor. Initiatives such as the European Defence Fund, the coordinated annual defence review (CARD) and more coherent financing for EU operations and capacity building efforts are all aimed at supporting the EU's strategic autonomy and the European Defence Technological and Industrial Base. The EUISS continues to support the development of CSDP through outreach activities and expert publications.

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  • 12January 2004

    On 12 January, the Institute organised a ‘brainstorming’ seminar on flexibility for ESDP that reviewed the latest developments in the Intergovernmental Conference as well as the Council.

  • 01January 2004

    Debate on proposals in the Constitutional Treaty to create a European Armaments, Military Capabilities and Research Agency show that national governments mostly are no longer hostile in principle to EU involvement in armaments policy.

  • 01January 2004

    Depuis le début des années 1990, les gouvernements européens ont lancé de nombreuses initiatives pour renforcer leur coopération dans le domaine de l'armement. Toutes ces initiatives se sont développées en dehors du cadre de l'Union européenne (UE). En effet, les Etats membres ont traditionnellement exclu la question de l'armement du processus européen d'intégration, préférant organiser leur coopération dans d'autres forums.

  • 01January 2004

    One year after the war in Iraq, the EU is still confronted with two major challenges. The first is in Iraq itself, where the US strategy of stabilisation and democratisation is encountering dramatic setbacks. The second challenge arises from the growing terrorist threat to Western interests and citizens, as seen in the terrible attacks in Madrid on 11 March.

  • 01January 2004

    In mid-June, land and land-air defence equipment manufacturers from all over the world will gather in Paris for the international exhibition "Eurosatory 2004". A major event for the global defence community, this biennial show traditionally provides an opportunity to not only present the latest technological developments, but also take stock of the situation of the industry

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    01January 2004

    Developing international and cross-agency intelligence cooperation has become imperative in today’s security environment. If the so-called ‘new threats’ are to be tackled collectively, it is not only desirable but also necessary to make collective threat assessments.

  • 01December 2003

    Up until now, EU member states have excluded armaments from the European integration process and have cooperated in this field outside the EU framework. However, there is a fair chance today that this will change: both the work of the Convention on the Future of Europe and the debate on the recent Commission Communication on a common defence equipment policy indicate a greater readiness among national governments vis-à-vis a possible EU involvement in armaments

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    01December 2003

    Space is a strategic asset, and its importance both in terms of technology and security cannot be overestimated.

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    01December 2003

    With this Chaillot Paper, the ‘European defence core documents’ collection reaches its fourth volume – stretching from Copenhagen, where the last European Council of 2002 was held, to Brussels, where the last one of 2003 took place.

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    01December 2003

    Since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 and the war in Iraq, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction has become a top priority for European policy-makers. According to the European Security Strategy, it is potentially the greatest threat to the EU’s security, in particular if it is linked to terrorism.

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