An agency of the EU

Alerts and Briefs

  • The EU and the NPT: drawing lines

    45 years after its inception, the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) faces old and new challenges. This Brief surveys recent developments ahead of the 2015 Review Conference of the Treaty. As a microcosm of the regime, the European Union is uniquely positioned to bridge the NPT’s main divides.

  • Sanctions against ‘aggressors’– seven lessons

    This Alert analyses the ‘track record’ of sanctions as a foreign policy tool. It gives a brief historical overview of the practice of sanctions, showing how in recent years international sanctions have tended to shift from being comprehensive to targeted, and examines the ‘lessons learned’.

  • The EU in a multiplex world

    The EUISS is now helping with the preparation of the HR/VP’s report assessing the ‘changes in the global environment’ which is to be delivered in June. In this Brief, the EUISS Director gives a first overview of some of the themes this report may include.

Publications

  • EUISS Yearbook of European Security 2015

    The EUISS Yearbook of European Security (YES) is an indispensable publication that aims to inform experts, academics, practitioners and, more generally, all those wishing to know more about the EU and security-related matters through innovative, evidence-based analysis and the display of crucial facts and figures.

  • A changing global environment

    A collaborative project by the entire EUISS research team, this Chaillot Paper analyses changes in the contemporary global environment according to eight distinct but interconnected perspectives. The publication aims to offer a comprehensive background analysis to the policy debates that will inform the drafting of the Report on the international geopolitical environment that the High Representative is due to present in 2015.

  • Riding the digital wave – The impact of cyber capacity building on human development

    This report on cybersecurity seeks to promote a development-focused approach to the issue. The authors address security not as an end in itself but rather as a means towards social, economic and political development, and argue that cyber capacity building is a developmental issue which requires cooperation among different policy communities.