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Regions

The EUISS conducts its research both topically and regionally, focusing on key issues of strategic importance to EU foreign policy. Alongside the immediate priorities in the EU's neighbourhood, the EU also focuses on emerging regions such as the Far East, as well as on traditional allies such as the United States.

MENA

The EU’s relations with the ‘Middle East Region’ actually cover three different but overlapping areas, each of which has its own peculiarities and distinctive relationship with Europe. They are the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean, the Middle East and the Gulf Region. 

Russia and eastern neighbours

Russia is the biggest neighbour of the European Union – and one of its most difficult partners. The EU’s Eastern neighbourhood is a region in transition. Diverging foreign policy orientations, frozen conflicts, and low levels of inter-state cooperation further fragment and polarise the region.

Africa

The diversity of the African continent and its states, the distinct privileged historical links that exist between some Member States and their former colonies, and the corresponding cultural and linguistic affinities, all represent an extraordinary potential for cooperation, and this extends to the as yet barely developed area of peace and security.

Asia

Reflecting the evolving priorities of EU foreign policy, the EUISS has begun developing research on Asia. The aspects the Institute focuses on are: the global implications of the rise of China and India, China’s role in Africa and the Middle East, security and international relations in East Asia, and non-proliferation.

Western Balkans

EU policy in the Western Balkans is based on stabilisation through integration. Following the 1999 crisis in Kosovo and NATO intervention, the EU member states recognised that a comprehensive policy for the whole region was needed, and in 2000 the Stabilisation and Association Process (SAP) was launched.

The Americas

The strength of EU-US relations rests on historical bonds, converging interests and commonality of values. Cooperating with the US represents an important aspect of almost all areas of EU foreign policy. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, rising powers such as Brazil and Mexico are also of increasing importance.

Alerts and Briefs

  • Low carbon development in Latin America

    This Alert looks at the challenges facing Latin America as it transitions from its current development paradigm to a low carbon development path. Which countries have the greatest potential when it comes to renewable energy investments?

  • Citizen security in Latin America

    This Alert explains why the reduction of lethal violence and other forms of victimisation is a precondition for ensuring inclusive and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).

  • The economic impact of violence in LAC: implications for the EU

    Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) can be considered to be the most violent region in the world, particularly when measured by homicide levels. Given the high costs of violence in LAC, how can systematic assessments of the economic cost of violence enhance the scope for EU preventive action?

Publications

  • After the EU Global Strategy – Building resilience

    As the EUGS approaches its first anniversary, and shortly before the release of a Joint Communication on resilience by the EEAS and the Commission, this volume, the second in the EUISS post-EUGS series, seeks to shed more light on the different definitions of the concept and how these may be applied in specific functional and geographic areas.

  • SMS – After the Arab Spring: what’s changed?

    The third edition of the EUISS Security Monthly Stats (SMS) illustrates data linked to the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). How has the region changed since the 2011 Arab Spring? And what has been the Union’s response in terms of Official Development Assistance (ODA)?

  • Defence industries in Arab states: players and strategies

    This Chaillot Paper analyses how Arab states strive to achieve strategic, economic and symbolic goals through indigenous armaments production, with some countries in the region showing a new determination to become more self-reliant in this domain. The paper focuses in particular on how efforts undertaken by Arab states to develop national defence technological and industrial bases (DTIBs) entail new relationships with defence suppliers.