Une agence de l'Ue

Publications


Dans l’optique de promouvoir au sein l’Union européenne une culture de sécurité commune et de contribuer à l’élaboration de la politique étrangère et de sécurité commune de l’UE (PESC) ainsi que d’enrichir le débat stratégique, l’EUISS distribue ses publications à un large public en Europe mais aussi dans le reste du monde qui se trouve au cœur de la communauté internationale stratégique.

La publication phare de l'Institut est sa série de Cahiers de Chaillot, qui est basée sur des recherches approfondies et ciblées. L'Institut publie également un Yearbook of European Security (YES) annuellement, ainsi que des Rapports et des publications plus courtes, appelées les Briefs et Alerts.

  • Winter is coming – Chilly winds across northern Europe

    Brief - No34 - 09 December 2016

    Jan Joel Andersson, Erika Balsyte

    Russia’s recent actions in eastern Europe and significant military build-up along its Western border and in the enclave of Kaliningrad has rattled many nerves. This Brief explores how, as a consequence, all the countries in the Nordic-Baltic region are now rearming.

  • Central Asian transitions: a health check

    Alert - No47 - 09 December 2016

    Martin Breitmaier

    In summer 2016, two unexpected events brought the issue of power transition to the top of the agenda in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. This Alert analyses how both transitions entail risks for Central Asia’s stability, but also potentially open up opportunities for further domestic liberalisation and regional cooperation.

  • Africa uprising? The protests, the drivers, the outcomes

    Brief - No33 - 02 December 2016

    Valerie Arnould, Aleksandra Tor, Alice Vervaeke

    The number of popular protests in Africa has increased significantly since the mid-2000s, reaching its peak in recent years. To what extent can this surge challenge sitting governments or even be the harbinger of broader social and political change on the continent?

  • Beyond the ICC exit crisis

    Alert - No46 - 02 December 2016

    Laura Kokko

    The recent decisions by Burundi, the Gambia and South Africa to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC) have prompted worries that more countries may leave the Hague-based tribunal which investigates war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity. But while it is clear that the ICC is facing important challenges to its credibility and legitimacy, the recent exits might not trigger a domino effect.