Une agence de l'Ue

Quick search results

  • European defence cooperation in the second machine age

    Over the past decades, defence cooperation has helped European countries preserve their security. Defence cooperation in the second machine age may, however, need to evolve and move beyond traditional joint procurement programmes to pertain also to new domains.

  • Funding EU defence cooperation

    Through carefully targeted financial incentives the European Commission hopes that the European Defence Fund can help change the rules of the game for European defence cooperation. But how might the Commission structure or modulate it?

  • The CARD on the EU defence table

    This Alert looks at the coordinated annual review on defence (‘CARD’) announced at the end of 2016. How could CARD change the way defence cooperation operates in Europe?

  • Africa growing? Past, present and future

    What generalisations can be made about African growth episodes between 1950 and today? This Brief seeks to dispel some of the negative narratives about Africa’s economic record, as well as discern factors which could lead to future growth on the continent.

  • Out of (and inside) Africa: migration routes and their impacts

    What impact have migration routes out of and within Africa had on EU migration policy? This Brief examines some of the Union’s efforts (and challenges) regarding the continent.

  • Unrest in Ethiopia: plus ça change?

    After tensions between the government and citizens reached a boiling point in November 2015, a vicious cycle of protests and repression subsequently took hold for over a year. What, if anything, has the ruling party learned?

  • Returns diplomacy: levers and tools

    In 2016, 42% of asylum-seekers who received an instruction to leave stayed in Europe, amounting to at least 130,000 people. What could the EU do to improve its returns bargains with third states?

  • Out of Syria: shifting routes and returns

    As the Syrian conflict grows in complexity, so too do the flows of people inside the country and into the neighbouring region. This Alert identifies three major shifts which will affect migration flows.

  • The crime-terrorism nexus

    A criminal past is a common, yet often overlooked, characteristic of many European jihadists. This Brief examines the link between petty crime and terrorism, as well as the ways in which criminal experiences shape terrorist actions.

  • SMS – Global migration: getting the trends right

    The second in the new EUISS series of Security Monthly Stats (SMS) looks at the sensitive issue of global migration. Are there really more migrants than ever before? And are people from the ‘global South’ migrating northwards?

  • The EU migration crisis – Getting the numbers right

    The 2015 migration crisis revealed gaps in the EU’s migration-related statistics. This Brief looks at how unreliable migration data can be manipulated, and seeks to reverse the narratives which are put forward by certain actors in order to pursue their own agendas.

  • Azerbaijan: drifts and shifts

    This Alert looks at Azerbaijan’s autocratic and assertive domestic turn, and explains the potential risks of the rebalancing of its foreign policy priorities by the ruling elites.

  • Securing the Energy Union: five pillars and five regions

    This Report examines the energy challenges facing the different regions of Europe, investigating shared priorities and common projects, as well as barriers to integration and cooperation. A series of chapters devoted to distinct regions examines what role the Energy Union can play to help address their energy challenges, including those related to energy security and relations with external suppliers.

  • Armenia: Russia first, EU second?

    Following recent constitutional changes, Armenians are set to go to the polls on 2 April to vote in parliamentary elections. What role does Russia play in the country's politics? And is there room to expand relations with the EU?

  • Defence industries in Arab states: players and strategies

    This Chaillot Paper analyses how Arab states strive to achieve strategic, economic and symbolic goals through indigenous armaments production, with some countries in the region showing a new determination to become more self-reliant in this domain. The paper focuses in particular on how efforts undertaken by Arab states to develop national defence technological and industrial bases (DTIBs) entail new relationships with defence suppliers.