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  • The internal-external nexus: criminal justice

    This Brief looks at the quite remarkable extent to which criminal justice cooperation has deepened – both within Europe and in the EU’s external relations. What mechanisms are in place to facilitate cooperation and avoid clashes in this highly sensitive policy area?


  • The internal-external nexus: re-bordering Europe

    The EU previously envisaged expanding its border-free travel area to create a single space across its neighbouring regions. Now it is witnessing the reappearance of geopolitical blocs and zones. What is the EU doing in the face of the need for a new border diplomacy?

  • Civil-military relations in the MENA: between fragility and resilience

    This Chaillot Paper examines the flaws and failures that have so far impeded a more functional and balanced relationship between civilian and military authorities in the Middle East and North Africa. The paper also highlights the importance of security sector reform (SSR) in consolidating the rule of law and, more generally, sustainable systems of governance.

  • Women in Daesh: jihadist ‘cheerleaders’, active operatives?

    This Brief examines the overlooked role of the women in the organisation, and argues they are every bit as dangerous as their male counterparts. But how should European security forces address this issue?

  • Colombia: Nobel present, uncertain future

    Last week, Colombians voted against the peace agreement that the government and the FARC had reached in August to end the country’s civil war. How did this happen? And how will the process move forward?

  • Georgia: a pre-election snapshot

    With Georgians set to go to the polls on Saturday 8 October, this Brief examines the changing dynamics of the country’s domestic politics and foreign relations over the last few years. What should be the priority for whoever wins the next parliamentary elections?

  • World Wide Webs: who governs the diasporas?

    Migrant groups are influential actors in the international arena. Globally, diaspora communities and governments alike are capitalising on this state of affairs, as demonstrated by the fact that diaspora lobbying is on the rise and governments are seeking to instrumentalise their expatriates. This Alert looks at how the EU finds itself increasingly exposed to foreign states’ interference through its migrant/diaspora communities.

  • App and coming: an ‘Uber migration’?

    Migrant groups and host communities have developed a number of smart technology apps aimed at providing new arrivals with information on housing, education and employment opportunities. This Alert looks at how EU authorities can utilise these new technologies to help migrants, while exploring the associated dilemmas.

  • Strategy matters – EU key documents 2015 - 2016

    Following up on the previously published ‘Defence Matters – EU Key Documents 2013’ and ‘Strategy Matters – EU Key Documents 2003-2014’, this compendium presents the two major documents released by the EEAS in June 2015 and June 2016 as part of the process of strategic reflection leading to the EU Global Strategy (EUGS) on foreign and security policy, elaborated under the aegis of HR/VP Federica Mogherini.

  • Military coups: a very short introduction

    This Brief seeks to explain why (and when) coups happen. What conditions are needed to persuade the military to attempt to topple a government? And what elements increase the likelihood of success or failure?

  • Strategic communications – East and South

    Both Russia and ISIL/Daesh have engaged in aggressive messaging and deceptive media campaigns, albeit with distinct narratives, targets and audiences. This Report analyses the ‘what’ and the ‘how’: the respective narratives of each actor, their specificities, their few similarities and their numerous differences. The analysis also draws attention to strategic communications efforts undertaken by the EU.

  • After the EUGS: specifying the military tasks

    This Alert looks at the indications in the EUGS on the way the military instrument(s) at the EU’s disposal should be used, further developed (in a cooperative manner) and connected to other internal and external actors.

  • After the EUGS: mainstreaming a new CSDP

    This Alert explains why CSDP ‘White Book’ or a Security and Defence Strategy (SDS) will have to be developed if the EUGS is to be fully implemented. But what should an SDS entail?

  • After the EUGS: connecting the dots

    The forthcoming publication of the European Commission’s Defence Action Plan (EDAP) and the likely creation of a European Defence Research Programme (ERDP) make institutional streamlining and creative thinking in the field of defence vital. How can the EU best rationalise its defence policy?

  • Fellow submarines

    Given the recent increase in Russian underwater activity in the Baltic Sea and North Atlantic, how can Europe to collectively manage, deter, and counter any undersea provocations? This Alert explains how the best underwater defences are submarines themselves.